PRODUCT

Literatum

Annual Reviews has relaunched its publications and corporate website on Atypon’s Literatum, the scholarly publishing industry’s most widely used online publishing platform.

The new site enables Annual Reviews, an Atypon client for 14 years, to create and maintain a unique brand for each of its 47 journals. Independent sections for authors, librarians, and researchers create a 'three-in-one' site architecture that makes user-specific content easily accessible.

The new site design – the publisher’s first in six years – is geared to preempt 'grab-and-go' user-behaviour by encouraging readers to engage with Annual Reviews’ site rather than merely downloading a PDF.

Prior to the redesign, the ratio of PDF-to-HTML usage was approximately 2:1, and site visits were brief. After the redesign, that ratio began moving beyond parity for some journals, and users now stay onsite nearly twice as long as they do when they visit just to download a PDF. In addition, the number of onsite searches has doubled, indicating sustained engagement with the entirety of the site’s content.

'As our publications site is also our corporate website, it was key that Literatum be able to support our company-wide rebranding as well as the new individualised branding of each journal,' said Liz Allen, Annual Reviews’ director of MarCom and strategic development. 'The interface’s consumerised features and personalied content have created a stickier site in which readers are able to fully engage with our content.'

'Engaging websites keep publishers central to the research experience by giving readers a reason to stay on their own sites rather than visiting pirated sites that can’t offer the targeted features and user experience provided by Literatum,' added Georgios Papadopoulos, Atypon’s founder and CEO.

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