PRODUCT

Executive Orders and Presidential Proclamations

Researchers will be able to access information critical to understanding historic events with a digital collection of executive orders and presidential proclamations.

When complete, the collection from ProQuest will encompass more than 79,000 executive orders, proclamations, directives and policy statements by US presidents from Washington to Obama, bringing together disparate content and making it easy to discover and work with. ProQuest Executive Orders and Presidential Proclamations is part of and can be searched along with ProQuest’s growing collection of U.S. government content, assembled within a technology architecture that improves research outcomes.
 
'ProQuest Executive Orders and Presidential Proclamations helps researchers find and understand the impact of the actions taken by past and current presidents of the US,' said Susan Bokern, ProQuest vice-president for information solutions.

'When searched together with our deep congressional and other executive branch content, researchers will have a better understanding of the roles and authorities of the executive and legislative branches of government. This primary source content is especially relevant today as we seek to understand how these authorities were executed by different presidents throughout US history.'
 
ProQuest’s team of government content experts worked in conjunction with archivists at the National Archives and Records Administration, Library of Congress, as well as federal agencies and academic libraries throughout the USA to assemble the world’s most comprehensive digital collection, including published documents, and hard-to-find handwritten manuscripts. They assembled the content document-by-document, enriching it with metadata and indexing that makes it easy to identify, locate and organise.

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