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BMC Psychology

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Open-access publisher BioMed Central has launched BMC Psychology, the newest addition to the BMC-series portfolio. This marks a significant milestone for the BMC-series family of open-access journals, as it is the first new journal since 2008 and will lead the way for other new launches within the series.

In recognition of the need to keep the community up to date with the latest research in psychology the BMC series developed BMC Psychology as the first solely dedicated open-access psychology journal of its kind, covering all aspects of psychology. It will also practice open peer review in keeping with all the medical journals currently published in the BMC series.

Deborah Kahn, BioMed Central's publishing director, said: 'We are excited to be launching this new addition to the BMC series, which we believe will quickly become one of the most important sources of open-access, peer-reviewed research across a broad range of disciplines in psychology.'

BMC Psychology will cover areas such as psychology, human behaviour and the mind, including developmental, clinical, cognitive, experimental, social, evolutionary and educational psychology, as well as personality and individual differences, as well as quantitative and qualitative research methods, including animal studies.

The launch edition includes a Q&A interview with section editor Irismar Reis de Oliveira, discussing current trends in psychotherapy, an editorial: 'putting the BMC into psychology publishing,' by Gordon Harold, and a research article looking at why people with HIV are less able to recognise facial emotion in comparison with non-infected people.