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Thomson Reuters surveys academic reputation

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The Intellectual Property & Science business of Thomson Reuters has launched its 2014 Academic Reputation Survey. The survey is now in its fifth consecutive year and aims to help gain a clearer understanding of the global research landscape and to inform the Times Higher Education World University Rankings. The survey is running until 18 April.

The survey directly engages more than 300,000 academics and researchers. Respondents are asked to identify the institutions they consider to be the best in terms of research and teaching, in specific regions, as well as globally. Responses are said to form a key building block, along with scholarly output, citation patterns and funding levels, for the Thomson Reuters Global Institutional Profiles database.

Respondents are asked to answer questions in six subject areas: engineering and technology; physical sciences; life sciences; clinical, preclinical and health; social sciences; and, arts and humanities.

In an effort to prevent language or translation bias, the survey is offered in nine languages: Arabic, Brazilian Portuguese, European Portuguese, English, French, German, Japanese, Simplified Chinese and Spanish.

'We are pleased to continue the Academic Reputation Survey with Times Higher Education and expect to see even more participants this year as awareness of the survey spreads,' said Gordon Macomber, managing director, Thomson Reuters Scientific & Scholarly Research. 'This initiative is critical in providing the academic community with an honest, user-based assessment of the global research landscape. It gives academics and researchers the opportunity to highlight what they see as the strongest universities within their fields.'