Free service collects tables of content

A new free service makes it easier to keep up-to-date with scholarly journals. ticTOCs  - Journal Tables of Contents Service provides access to the most recent tables of contents of over 11,000 scholarly journals from more than 400 publishers.  It helps scholars, researchers, academics and anyone else keep up-to-date with what’s being published in the most recent issues of journals on almost any subject.

Users of ticTOCs can find journals of interest by title, subject or publisher, view the latest TOC and link through to the full text of over 250,000 articles (where institutional or personal subscriptions, or open access, allow). Users can also save selected journals to MyTOCs so that they can view future TOCs (free registration is required if you want to permanently save your MyTOCs).  ticTOCs also helps to export selected TOC RSS feeds to popular feedreaders such as Google Reader and Bloglines and allows users to import article citations into RefWorks (where institutional or personal subscriptions allow).

ticTOCs has been funded under the JISC Users & Innovations programme, and has been developed by an international consortium consisting of the University of Liverpool Library (lead), Heriot-Watt University, CrossRef, ProQuest, Emerald, RefWorks, MIMAS, Cranfield University, Institute of Physics, SAGE Publishers, Inderscience Publishers, DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals), Open J-Gate, and Intute.


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