SAGE to address library value in the developing world

A research study is investigating the value of libraries value across the developing world.

The project by Sage – 'Library Value in the Developing World' – will investigate the value of academic libraries for teaching and research staff at 12 institutions in countries classified by the World Bank as low- and middle-income economies (with a GNI less than $4035).  

The aim of the study is to provide the academic library community in developing countries with a better understanding of the connections between academic libraries and academic departments, and to identify practical ways to enhance these relationships.

The project will focus on the similarities and differences between different countries, using case studies from the following countries:

  • Honduras (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Honduras);
  • Indonesia (Indonesian Research Institute);
  • Ghana (University of Cape Coast);
  • Georgia (National Scientific Library);
  • Kenya (Maseno University);
  • Nigeria (Convenant University and Obafemi Awolowo University);
  • Philippines (University of the Philippines Visayas);
  • Senegal (University of Thies);
  • Uganda (Makerere University);
  • Ukraine (Institute of Intellectual Property of National University, Kiev); and
  • Zimbabwe (University of Zimbabwe)  

The research project is a follow up to the 2012 SAGE commissioned study, ‘Working together: evolving value for academic libraries’, which investigated library value and reported on findings from the UK, US and Scandinavia.

'Sage is committed to supporting librarians in ensuring the wide dissemination of high quality research,' said Stephen Barr, president at Sage International.

'In frequent conversations with our librarian partners globally, a common problem we hear is that more recognition is needed within institutions of the value of the services that libraries provide.  

'We hope that this research project can be a step towards helping librarians in developing countries identify ways of promoting their services and of collaborating with academic departments to make full use of the value of libraries for teaching and research.'

The results of the research project will be published in the summer of 2013.

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