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February/March 2006

ANALYSIS
Relationship building is key outcome of digital divide meeting
Meaningful collaborations may be necessary for taking research information to the developing world, writes Vanessa Spedding

ENGINEERING
Playing a part in technology development
The wealth of free information on the web is attractive to engineers but Siân Harris discovers that peer-reviewed literature and databases can still have a vital role in the research process

PROFILE
Library science meets business
Michael Koenig, professor in the College of Information and Computer Science and Palmer School of Library and Information Science, Long Island University, USA.

SHOW REPORT
Users set the agenda
Providing the information that users want, when and how they want it, were the themes that dominated discussions at the recent Online Information conference. Tom Wilkie and Nick Morris report

EVENTS
March - June 2006

December 2005/January 2006

LETTERS
Research should be the priority (Stevan Harnad)
and
Publishers concerns are valid (Sally Morris)

PROFILE: MICHAEL MABE
Publishing about publishing
Michael Mabe, director of academic relations at Elsevier

ANALYSIS
Industry considers RSS
Web developers are excited by the way that RSS technology can alert users to new journal articles and other content without them needing to visit dozens of web sites each day but are the users so excited? Industry analyst David Mort investigates

LIBRARY MANAGEMENT
RFID industry confronts privacy fears
RFID is becoming a popular way to monitor materials in libraries and elsewhere but the use of this wireless technology has prompted questions about users' privacy. Dr Christian Kern, the head of systems development at Switzerland's Bibliotheca RFID Library Systems does not believe there is any cause for concern

COLLABORATION
Project lays foundations for future scholarly communication
Dr Leni Helmes, head of IT development at FIZ Karlsruhe, describes a project with the Max Planck Society to support open access to the society's research information

DATABASES
Consultation helps database development
With over 500 customers signing up in its first six months Scopus has plenty of reason to be pleased with its abstracting and indexing database. Now, a year after launch, we ask the company's marketing manager Ginny Hendricks why she thinks the project has been successful

October/November 2005

PROFILE: TEMIS
Language skills help text mining
French text-mining company Temis believes that working in multiple languages is essential for getting the most out of electronic information

PUBLISHING SERVICES
Automation reduces the cost of archiving
Automating the way that data is indexed, sorted and structured can save publishers and societies considerable time and expense, writes Philip Paterson of UK-based SomCom

REPOSITORIES
Archive programmes gain momentum
Electronic archives of published and unpublished results are becoming popular with academic institutions but they are not without controversy. Nadya Anscombe investigates

STANDARDS
Information counting gathers pace
Peter Shepherd, project director of COUNTER, describes this international effort to create standards for measuring how online information is used

OPINION
One less job for publishers
Marketing is the latest task to be outsourced to specialist agencies, according to Pinar Erzin


July/August 2005

RESEARCH INFORMATION SPECIAL REPORT 2005

Switch to online delivery continues to gather pace
Where traditional STM publishing is starting to feel the pinch, the online sector is burgeoning, outlines David Mort in his annual industry overview.

The infrastructure is there: time to populate
The signs are that academics are ready to go for self-archiving. All they require is the knowledge of what's possible, says Vanessa Spedding.

New tools for libraries bring chapter of innovation
Library management systems are moving on, and will allow libraries to offer increasingly powerful information management and linking facilities, John Sherwell reports.

Including corporate profiles of:


May/June 2005

OPEN ACCESS: THE SWEDISH HUB
The Swedish hub at the heart of open access
The proliferation of open-access resources means that searching for the right material can be a headache. Vanessa Spedding reports on a European initiative that's easing the pain

OPEN ACCESS: CHOICE
Offering choice in the era of open access
The topic of open-access publishing has both champions and denouncers but Graham Vaughan Lees, founding editor and publishing director of TheScientificWorldJOURNAL, believes, from his experience, that the real issue to be considered is how to make best use of the internet, irrespective of who pays

OPEN ACCESS: PUBLISHING MODELS
Reinventing journal publishing
The internet has already shaken up the traditional way that information is found and viewed but far more radical changes are possible with the way that research is published. John Smith, a librarian at the UK's University of Kent, argues the case for a completely new model

ANALYSIS
Good for research? Good for publishers?
The EU's push to increase R&D spending ought to benefit publishers and content providers in science, technology, and medicine, but mixed fortunes may lie ahead, warns David Mort

PROFILE: JOHAN STEENBAKKERS
Archiving without borders
John Murphy profiles director of e-strategy and property management, Koninklijke Bibliotheek, the Netherlands


March/April 2005

NEWS ANALYSIS
Swets focuses on agent business technology
At the start of February Swets decided to sell Extenza e-Publishing Services and Extenza Marketing Solutions. Siân Harris investigates why the Netherlands-based subscription agent is moving away from providing services for publishers

SEARCH TOOLS
Looking for pearls
It can be hard to find all the relevant material online when there is so much available. The OAIster project of the University of Michigan in the USA provides a solution by harvesting the information that is hidden in over 400 institutions around the world. Katerina Hagerdorn, metadata harvesting librarian for the project, describes what this means

PRICING
Weighing up the cost of journals
Librarians dread heavy year-on-year increases in journal prices - but the extent of this issue varies greatly between publishers. Last year Oxford University Press commissioned independent research to discover some of the facts behind journal pricing. Siân Harris reports

PROFILE: LARS BARFOD
Software sifts through diverse chemical data
John Murphy profiles the CEO of the chemical software firm Elsevier MDL

ANALYSIS
The way we navigate data may be changing
When you are going somewhere new, do you prefer to follow a map, ask directions or use a mixture of both? As with physical navigation, people show strong preferences when retrieving virtual information but this could be changing, as David Mort discovers


January/February 2005

ENGINEERING
High-tech business embraces new library technology
IT and communications companies are expected to lead the way in new technology but does this extend to their internal systems? In the case of the library at global telecoms firm BT, the answer is yes, writes John Sherwell

ONLINE 2004: SHOW REPORT
Industry prepares for the future
As we begin 2005 there are many opportunities and uncertainties for the industry. Siân Harris visited Online Information 2004 to discover what the years ahead hold

PROFILE: CHARLES BESSON
Tailoring tools - from clothing to patents
John Murphy profiles the chief executive officer of Questel Orbit

PORTABLE DEVICES
Mobile data could help medicine
For mobile workers such as medical staff, portable devices may hold the key to accessing research resources. David Mort investigates

RESEARCH IN FRANCE
Portals enable national access
Managing the information requirements and access for one university or corporate library can be complicated enough but the issues are increased when the researchers are spread throughout a country and beyond. Eric Goettmann and Marie-Catherine Gunet explain how portals have helped provide information access at the French national research centre CNRS

LEARNED SOCIETY PUBLISHING: OPINION
'Societies should not be forgotten'
Learned societies have always played a major role in scholarly publishing but changes in business models threaten to destabilise this. We asked René Olivieri, the CEO of society publisher Blackwell Publishing, for his insight into this sector


November/December 2004

EMPLOYMENT
Adapting to advance
Information professionals can benefit from a dynamic employment market, so long as they're prepared to change with the environment. Vanessa Spedding surveys the situation

ANALYSIS
STM publishing provides a safe haven in choppy waters
The information industry has suffered in recent years after the dotcom bubble burst, but David Mort reveals that STM publishing has weathered the storm

RESEARCH COLLABORATION
New networks promote international teamwork
Collaboration is common in research but it can place huge demands on the computer networks used. Now an international initiative is providing a new way for high bandwidth users to work together, writes David Salmon, the manager of UKLight, the UK's part in the initiative

PROFILE: KEITH VAN RIJSBERGEN
Digging for information
John Murphy profiles Professor Keith Van Rijsbergen, head of the information retrieval group at the University of Glasgow

BIBLIOGRAPHIC DATABASES
Data plays growing role
CABI plays a part in most areas of agricultural and health research. Siân Harris asked two of the organisation's directors about bibliographic databases and their role in agricultural publishing


September/October 2004

ANALYSIS
Users doubt benefits of consolidation
David Mort kicks off our new analysis section with a critical look at the effects of mergers and acquisitions on end-users

OPEN ACCESS
Interactive peer review enhances journal quality
In all the talk of journals pricing and reducing the turnaround of the peer review process, the issue of quality can get overlooked. Ulrich Pöschl describes an open-access journal that is seeking to redress the balance

PROFILE: JAMES MICHALKO
When business and library training meet
John Murphy profiles the president and CEO of the Research Libraries Group, an international organisation for libraries, museums and archives

PATENTS
Consolidation strikes the patent industry
Thomson plans to buy Information Holdings, the parent company of MicroPatent. Peter Rees found out what this might mean to patent users

ARCHIVING
Partners go Dutch to preserve the minutes of science
Two years ago Elsevier became the first publisher to agree to deposit all its journals articles into the Dutch National Library. Elsevier's director of IT Solutions, Geoffrey Adams, explains why and how it is progressing so far

INDUSTRY VIEW
Flourishing from complexity
With the rise of the internet changing this industry beyond recognition, scientific publishing is becoming more complex. Siân Harris found out why this could make the agent's role more important than ever


July/August 2004

RESEARCH INFORMATION SPECIAL REPORT 2004
STM information market still looks healthy
David Mort, Director of IRN Research, reviews the European online STM information market

Including corporate profiles of:


May/June 2004

OPEN ACCESS
Will learned societies signal the change?
Reforming science publishing will affect more than just the dissemination of science: it could catalyse more fundamental changes. The learned societies might be best placed to shape the outcome, suggests Vanessa Spedding

LEGAL DEPOSIT
New legal deposit laws include digital data
In future, publishers will be required to deposit digital information that is published in the UK into the country's national libraries. Siân Harris investigates what this means

TEXT MINING
New centre boosts biotech text mining
Professor John Keane, co-director of the National Centre for Text Mining in Manchester, UK, describes the aims of the centre

PROFILE: JERRY KLINE
Running a business is like running a marathon
John Murphy profiles the founder and CEO of the library IT provider, Innovative Interfaces

RADI0-TAGGED BOOKS
Why librarians should switch on their radios
Radio-frequency identification is emerging as a good way to improve automation and security in many business sectors. Birgit Lindl, from Bibliotheca RFID Library Systems, reports on why RFID is important for libraries

DIGITAL CURATION
Should we be prepared to face a future without digital curation?
A new digital curation centre in the UK will help research institutions to safeguard research data for years to come. Peter Burnhill, the centre's interim director, reports


March/April 2004

BUSINESS CONTINUITY FOR LIBRARIANS
You can't read e-journals when the lights go out
Although librarians worry about budgets and 'Big Deals', David Mort warns that they should also be concerned about business continuity

DATA STORAGE
Will banking data improve research output?
A UK-funded project is blurring the distinction between lab notebooks, journals, and libraries, by storing data and results electronically. Peter Rees explores the implications

PUBLISHERS AND READERS: THE IEE VIEW
Serving today's user
Modern publishers need to have personal contact with their readers and not just sell corporate site licences, argues Martin Smith, publishing director of the IEE

PROFILE: DARLENE WALTERS
Maths teacher turned publisher
John Murphy profiles the senior vice-president for publishing, and operating officer, of the American Institute of Physics

Q&A: ERIC VAN AMERONGEN
An agent's view
Since Eric van Amerongen took over as chief executive officer of the Netherlands-based Royal Swets and Zeitlinger two years ago, the company, and indeed the science, technology, and medicine (STM) publishing industry, have seen some major changes. Siān Harris sought his perspective on this industry and its future

THOMSON ISI
A road map to scientific excellence
John Murphy finds that Thomson ISI is interested in providing information about information, and not in becoming a primary publisher


January/February 2004

THE VIEW FROM THE BRITISH LIBRARY
Powering the world's knowledge
Lynne Brindley, chief executive of The British Library, looks at what the future holds for libraries and information professionals

PROFILE: SALLY MORRIS
'A one-person dynamo'
John Murphy profiles Sally Morris, chief executive of the Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers

PATENT PICTURES
It's patently good news
Making pictures out of the words in patents is changing the way high-tech companies do business. And it's good for the patent searchers themselves, Peter Rees discovers

TAYLOR & FRANCIS
Consolidation promises growth for STM publisher
In the fragmented world of STM publishing, Taylor & Francis has a bold strategy to unite companies under its ownership. Catherine James reports


winter 2003

THE VIRTUAL LIBRARY
Out with print, in with the PC
The world's biggest pharmaceutical company will not have a single, traditional library by the end of this year. Peter Rees examines the challenges in creating an international, company-wide 'virtual library'

PROFILE: ANNETTE THOMAS
The call of Nature
John Murphy profiles Annette Thomas, managing director, Nature Publishing Group

EUROPEAN STM BUSINESS TRENDS
Science makes money for Europe's information companies
David Mort, Director of IRN Research, provides a snapshot of recent trends amongst leading STM information companies in Europe

DISSEMINATING STM INFORMATION
Extended expectations need extended services
The way scientific information was disseminated in print may hold lessons for the electronic age. Tom Wilkie examines the potential


autumn 2003

COMMERCE AND RESEARCH
Why commercial publishers are good for research
Arie Jongejan, CEO Science & Technology, Elsevier, makes an impassioned plea for fair recognition of the contribution commercial publishers make to science

NEW TECHNOLOGIES
Publishers respond to changing technologies
As the opportunities presented by new technologies expand, Sarah Kellman finds that publishers are responding in a variety of ways

PATENT ANALYSIS SOFTWARE
Visualising patterns of meaning in patents
Increasingly, patents are becoming the most important first publication route for scientific information and they are becoming more complex. But, as Peter Rees discovers, new software will make patent analysis easier

PROFILE: JOHN SACK
A true high wire act
John Murphy profiles John Sack, electronic publishing pioneer and Silicon Valley veteran

DATA SEARCHING
Fishing in the data ocean
Technology is available to help researchers find the information they need in the vast oceans of data on the Internet, according to Robert Snedden


summer 2003

DIGITAL RIGHTS MANAGEMENT
Business saviour or content enslaver?
The information world is divided over whether digital rights management (DRM) is a good or a bad thing. Vanessa Spedding looks into the situation

INTERVIEW: MARK STORM
Discover your own qualities
In the Internet age, publishers, librarians and subscription agents are all going to have to find out what they're good at and how they can best add value in the world of electronic publishing. Tom Wilkie sought the views of Mark Storm from Swets Blackwell

TRACKING USERS
Technology designed for tracking readers turns over a new leaf
Scientists are no longer coming into libraries to borrow journals, but the technology of online access offers librarians, publishers, and subscription agents a new methods of keeping track of who is reading what - if only they can get the measurements right. Tom Wilkie reports

RESOURCE GUIDES
The right tool for the job? A guide to resources
The growth in resources to support learning, teaching, and research can make finding high-quality resources time-consuming and frustrating. Resource Guides direct researchers to key, high-quality resources, writes Adam Gardner

PROFILE: PETER HENDRIKS
Man of the people
John Murphy profiles the chief executive of Kluwer Academic Press


spring 2003

DATA PRESERVATION
Great data, but will it last?
While most of us fathom out how to navigate the new digital information landscape, those with foresight are worrying about the past - how to preserve electronic content. Vanessa Spedding reports.

STM PUBLISHING
To be useful, it must be open
The canopy of scientific research literature has to unfold in the open air, says Jan Velterop.

LINKING
Linking evolved: The future of online research
When information spread across a variety of sources is linked together, there are advantages for researchers and publishers alike. Amy Brand and Kristen Fisher explore recent shifts in linking that promise even more benefits.

PROFILE: MIKE TANSEY
The literary science publisher
John Murphy profiles the President and CEO of Thomson Scientific.

INFORMATION SHARING
Building roads in the new scientific information landscape
Suzan Brown on the development of the information sharing industry.

REVIEW: NOTABENE AND BIBLIOSCAPE
Getting better all the time
Felix Grant updates the advances in two bibliographic database systems.

THE USES OF KNOWLEDGE
A new model for the knowledge economy?
How we use and control knowledge is a subject of hot debate. The ultimate challenge is to balance competing forces for the good of society, suggests Vanessa Spedding.


autumn 2002

REVIEW: SWETSWISE
How agents add value in the electronic age
Tom Wilkie finds that the online content provision in SwetsWise points the way to the future of the subscription agent in the electronic information age


PATENT SEARCHING
The Web drags patents into 21st Century
Patent searching is a tricky business. Until recently the Web has done little to improve the situation - but that's all changing now. Vanessa Spedding reports


KNOWLEDGE PROFESSIONALS
If knowledge is power, meet the world leaders
Due to the rapid development of information and communications technologies, and the phenomenal growth of networks, especially the explosion of the Internet and the Web, 'knowledge professionals' and their information skills have become vital to the scientific and research community. Robin Murray of Fretwell-Downing reports


CONSORTIAL PURCHASING
Time runs out for unnatural selection
The future of consortial purchasing and site licensing is under review. Mark Rowse, CEO of Ingenta, asks whether the days of the 'Big Deal' are numbered


PRINT VS DIGITAL
The journey from printed page to screen
The move from printed product to electronically-available material is a massive operation, but a lot still needs to be done for the next generation of products and services. Karen Hunter of Elsevier Science reports


CHEMISTRY ONLINE
An ideal formula for chemists
Navigating a path through the maze of information available online is a tricky task for chemists. Jenny Drey lights the way forward



summer 2002

OPEN SOCIETY INITIATIVE
What is best practice for open access?
The fuss about the future of journals publishing is showing signs of abating, leaving the path clear for a harmonious way forward. Vanessa Spedding reports.


CHEMICAL MARK-UP LANGUAGE
The chemical brotherhood
It has always been more difficult for chemistry to keep up in the Internet age; but, as David Bradleydiscovers, a new language could herald a new era for the discipline.


SCHOLARLY PUBLISHING AND ACADEMIC RESOURCES COALITION
SPARC ignites scholarly publishing
Alison Buckholtz outlines SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition), an initiative to make scientific journals more accessible.


PROFILE: SIMON JONES
Always be logical
John Murphy profiles the head of technology UK for Dialog Corporation.



spring 2002

JOURNAL CROSS-LINKING
The Web's potential untangled
Vanessa Spedding reports on a revolution in the making, as rival publishers cross-link to each other's journals on the Web.


PROFILE: JEFFREY HILLIER
The communicator
John Murphy profiles the President and founder of TheScientificWorld.


ELECTRONIC REFERENCING
We all need a good reference
The unstoppable increase in information has called for better, more efficient record-keeping. Felix Grant charts the move from file cards to electronic referencing.


CHEMISTRY
A database approach to chemical reactions
There are almost too many resources for chemists hoping to unearth compound structures, organic reaction schemes, and even failed syntheses. David Bradley digs in to find out what can be mined.



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